The Cattle are “Ghanaians” but the Herders are Strangers: Farmer-Herder Conflicts, Expulsion Policy, and Pastoralist Question in Agogo, Ghana

by Azeez Olaniyan, Michael Francis, and Ufo Okeke-Uzodike

Abstract

The phenomenon of farmer-herders conflict across West Africa has prompted management strategies by several governments across the subcontinent. One of the conflict resolution mechanisms has been the policy of expulsion, which the Ghanaian state adopted as a response to incessant conflict between the settled agriculturalists and migrating Fulani herders. This paper focuses on migration and conflict as well as the intrigues and politics of expulsion of Fulani pastoralist from Agogo town in Ghana since 2009. There are multiple factors responsible for the migration of Fulani herders to Agogo area that are linked to climate change. We also examine the social and political factors triggering the expulsion as well as agitation to expel the Fulani. Counter to this we examine the Fulani reactions towards this development. Through this we also critique the policy of expulsion as a means of dealing with the pastoralist question. By means of a critical assessment of the conflict we offer strategies for policy and reconciliation.

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Azeez Olaniyan is a post-doctoral research fellow, International and Public Affairs Cluster, School of Social Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus.

Michael Francis is a lecturer, Development Cluster, School of Social Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus.

Ufo Okeke-Uzodike is Professor, International and Public Affairs Cluster, School of Social Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg Campus.

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